Self-Portrait c.1799 Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851

Wikipedia:

Joseph Mallord William Turner RA (23 April 1775 – 19 December 1851), known as J. M. W. Turner,[a] was an English Romantic painter, printmakerand watercolourist, known for his brilliant, expressive colourisation, imaginative landscapes and turbulent, often violent marine paintings.

He was born in Maiden Lane, Covent Garden, London, to a modest lower middle-class family. He lived in London all his life, retaining his Cockney accent and assiduously avoiding the trappings of success and fame. A child prodigy, Turner studied at the Royal Academy of Arts from 1789, enrolling when he was 14, and exhibited his first work there at 21. During this period, he also served as an architectural draftsman. Thereafter he earned a steady income from commissions and sales, which due to his troubled, contrary nature, were often begrudgingly accepted. He opened his own gallery in 1804 and became professor of perspective at the Academy in 1807, where he lectured until 1828, although he was viewed as profoundly inarticulate. He traveled to Europe from 1802, typically returning with voluminous sketchbooks.


He left behind over 2,000 paintings and 19,000 drawings and sketches. He had been championed by the leading English art critic John Ruskin from 1840, and is today regarded as having elevated landscape painting to an eminence rivaling history painting.[1] Widely considered one of the greatest masters of British watercolour landscape and marine painting, he is sometimes referred to as “the painter of light”.[2] A deeply experimental and progressive artist, his influence can be found in the works of painters as diverse as Claude Monet and Mark Rothko.

Now we move from the strange and disturbing to the calm and beautiful. There is a reason Mr. Turner’s art was so popular; he was a master of light and dark in a very unforgiving medium. Enjoy!

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