TechnoChitlins

…nuggets of information, idiocy, and music from Lower Alabama

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River Hornpipe

George Caleb Bingham – The Jolly Flatboatmen

George Caleb Bingham - The Jolly Flatboatmen

George Caleb Bingham – The Jolly Flatboatmen

 

Christmas Kill

George Caleb Bingham – Washington Crossing The Delaware -1856-71

George Caleb Bingham - Washington Crossing The Delaware -1856-71

George Caleb Bingham – Washington Crossing The Delaware -1856-71

 

Rollin’ on the River

George Caleb Bingham – Jolly Flatboatmen

George Caleb Bingham - Jolly Flatboatmen

George Caleb Bingham – Jolly Flatboatmen

 

Vote Early, Vote Often

George Caleb Bingham-The Verdict of the People -1854-55

George Caleb Bingham-The Verdict of the People -1854-55

George Caleb Bingham-The Verdict of the People -1854-55

 

George Caleb Bingham Week at TechnoChitlins

George Caleb Bingham Self-Portrait

George Caleb Bingham Self-Portrait

Wikipedia:

George Caleb Bingham (March 20, 1811 – July 7, 1879) was an American artist whose paintings of American life in the frontier lands along the Missouri River exemplify the Luminist style. Left to languish in obscurity, Bingham’s work was rediscovered in the 1930s. By the time of his bicentennial in 2011, he was considered one of the greatest American painters of the 19th century. That year the George Caleb Bingham Catalogue Raisonné Supplement Of Paintings & Drawings—directed and edited by Bingham scholar Fred R. Kline—announced the authentication of ten recently discovered paintings by Bingham. As of June 2015, a total of twenty-three (23) newly discovered paintings by Bingham have been authenticated and are listed with the GCBCRS.[1]

Great, authentic Americana. I do so love this stuff…

 

Quiet Dignity

Henri Regnault – Man Sitting in Burnous

Henri Regnault - Man Sitting in Burnous

Henri Regnault – Man Sitting in Burnous

 

Poesy, a warning

THE WRATH OF THE AWAKENED SAXON
by Rudyard Kipling

It was not part of their blood,
It came to them very late,
With long arrears to make good,
When the Saxon began to hate.

They were not easily moved,
They were icy — willing to wait
Till every count should be proved,
Ere the Saxon began to hate.

Their voices were even and low.
Their eyes were level and straight.
There was neither sign nor show
When the Saxon began to hate.

It was not preached to the crowd.
It was not taught by the state.
No man spoke it aloud
When the Saxon began to hate.

It was not suddently bred.
It will not swiftly abate.
Through the chilled years ahead,
When Time shall count from the date
That the Saxon began to hate.

“they were enamoured of poesy and the fine arts”

 

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